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On July 4, let me spell out the dictionary definition of independence: freedom from control, influence, support, aid or the like, of others.

To me, independence especially means no support or aid of others. I do not make any money from the creative works that I produce for gay adult men. I give away, absolutely free of charge, my science fiction time travel adventure with sexually explicit man-on-man scenes named Moon Men Deep Inside. My digital illustrations do not generate revenue for me. All of my illustrations (located at various places online include here at deviantART) are absolutely free of charge, too. Visit my website DesouzaWeb to see more.

Independence = No Making Money

Why is it that I do not make money from my creative works?

I accept that what I do is not going to appeal to any “mass audience” in the gay world. Some gay men have said that they especially like how I depict men so realistically. Others have said that my work is too extreme because of the violence that I depict so openly and how the men I create who treat each other sometimes so brutally. Still others say that what I do is not “normal” for them.

Not "normal" can be interpreted to mean that I am a gay male who sees things in this life from a different perspective than some other gay males. My storytelling approach in text and in 3D digital art is to focus on highly masculine men who are sexually attracted to other men who also are highly masculine. I also choose to depict the linkage between violence and sex—a controversial choice on my part. Personally, I do not enjoy the boy-meets-boy-and-falls-in love kind of storytelling that is very prominent and popular within the gay male community today. I also am turned off by the typical effeminate male portrayals of us gay men on television and in movies. That is not who I am and so it's no surprise I prefer to focus instead upon gay males who are mature in life and who are wise in the ways of the world.

This creative choice I have made means that I pay attention to gay males who are age 30 and older in contrast to younger flamboyant and effeminate gay men–probably the most identifiable and stereotypical gay men across a wide variety of cultures here in the present day.

Because I work within the bara genre, which is a genre that a much smaller audience finds appealing–compared to other genres of visual works, I have to accept no money and a smaller following. I accept these things completely.

Bara genre explained. Bara genre works depict gay male same-sex feelings and sexual identity with masculine or muscular males that is sometimes violent and exploitative. The more vanilla works of young and shirtless gay men falling in love with other young and shirtless gay men are a lot more safe and less emotionally challenging for the viewer. Those are fucking boring to me, but you can get off on whatever you prefer to get off on.

Opposing Compulsions

My creative works explore conflicting and opposing compulsions that all men have. On one side there are impulses men have towards sustaining life, engaging in love, and being attracted to others. In the opposing direction are impulses men have towards being aggressive, engaging in violence, and, causing pain and death.

For centuries, artists and storytellers around the world have found inspiration in these two opposing human compulsions that no man is able to resist or impede merely by his conscious will alone. I am not entirely aware of any specific intent on my part to explore this duality of man’s compulsions. Nor do I plan my creative efforts so that I purposefully can reveal psychoanalytic findings. I just continue to work and create. What turns out turns out.

Underground Influences

As a gay male, I have been influenced by the work of underground artists, illustrators, and storytellers (listed below) who have produced homoerotic visual works of a surreal rather than realistic nature specifically for a gay adult male audience. My work, like theirs, creates an imaginary world of fantasy that is not intended to exist in our real world:

  • Tom of Finland
  • Dom "Etienne" Orejudos
  • Sadao Hasegawa
  • Gengoroh Tagame
  • Ulf
  • Greasetank

So, I'm giving you a free gift! moonmendeepinside.com/download… Free copy of my science fiction time travel adventure, "Moon Men Deep Inside" -- no strings attached.
Maybe I'm daring and adventurous. Or just plain out of my mind. I wrote long-format stories about gay men in the future who work deep inside the moon as time travel agents.

My characters in the eBook series entitled "Moon Men Deep Inside" are highly masculine gay men. I refuse to write about gay male characters who are flamboyant and effeminate stereotypes. Instead, I go in the opposite direction. All of my gay male characters are macho, muscular bara genre types. Here's my illustration of the lead character, Ted Avila, from "Moon Men Deep Inside":
 
See it here on Deviantart.com desouzaweb.deviantart.com/art/…"

My gay male characters in "Moon Men Deep Inside" are depicted as having sex with one another. What would be the point of having gay male characters that did not have sex with one another!? My characters just are not stereotypical clichés. In fact, my characters faithfully represent the bara genre, written by gay men for gay men, depicting gay male, same-sex feelings and sexual identity of masculine, muscular men who sometimes behave in aggressive, violent, or exploitative ways towards one another. I would choose to hang out with that kind of gay male any day of my life. I also happen to believe that, from a gay writer’s point of view, that kind of gay male character is science fiction is far more worth the time and effort. So much of the gay romances that you can find in print, on television, or in films come across as just one more stereotypical cliché.

I decided to jump right into writing about how I think the moral codes and sexual behaviors of gay males a couple of hundred years from now might look like to us here in the 21st century. I had a lot of fun writing about this futuristic speculation and I believe that gay adult male readers will enjoy it, too.

Gene Roddenberry, who created Star Trek, told me in an interview I conducted with him in Hollywood in the 1970s about how he avoided depicting the ways he really thought people from Captain Kirk’s time would be in terms of their moral codes or sexual behaviors for fear of turning off the audience in the mid-1960s. In fact, Roddenberry took every opportunity to depict Kirk in sexual encounters with many different females, which during Roddenberry’s lifetime was a sure sign that a man is macho and worthy of admiration. And, of course, there were no gay male characters at all in the original Star Trek. Looking back to that era, nobody should find that surprising. The emphasis in those days was upon the so-called “free love” culture, but in storytelling on television, at least, that was shown to mean straight people having the freedom to love (or have sex with) whomever they wanted.

My science fiction storytelling is for the 21st century and for gay adult men. My storytelling explores conflicting and opposing compulsions that all men have whether they are gay or not. On one side there are impulses men have towards sustaining life, engaging in love, and being attracted to others. In the opposing direction are impulses men have towards being aggressive, engaging in violence, and, causing pain and death. My characters are gay male time travel agents who are based deep inside the moon. Part of their time travel missions to Earth specifically require these agents to use sexual manipulation of other men! Not exactly politically-correct in 2014, but perhaps 300 or so years from today, society will look at gay men through a different lens than today.

I was very pleased to get this response from a reader in the San Francisco Bay Area which accurately captures a serious flaw with most gay science fiction today: 

"It’s a courageous step. Gay science fiction can be a very hard sell indeed, which is why too little of it is published (that is, gay science fiction as distinct from the oceans of erotica being churned out by the m/m e-presses, most of which is barely recognizable as science fiction, and much more easily identified as erotica with futuristic props and set dressing!)"


My creative works belong within the bara genre. This little word is shortened from barazuko, which in Japanese means rose-tribe, a code phrase for gay men.

Bara works are produced by gay men for gay men. The genre depicts gay male, same-sex feelings and sexual identity of masculine, muscular men who sometimes behave in aggressive, violent, or exploitative ways towards one another.

This is not about romantic gay love or hearts and flowers. Bara is wild, adventurous, and unflinching in how it mirrors real life behaviors of male aggression, power trips, violent tendencies, and exploitation.

Since I was born in California, the bara illustrations that I create are a USA version and they do not exclusively focus on Asian men like in the Japanese bara works. I am one of the few people outside of Asia who create works within a USA version of bara.

My creative works explore conflicting and opposing compulsions that all men have. On one side there are impulses men have towards sustaining life, engaging in love, and being attracted to others. In the opposing direction are impulses men have towards being aggressive, engaging in violence, and, causing pain and death.

For centuries, artists and storytellers around the world have found inspiration in these two opposing human compulsions that no man is able to resist or impede merely by his conscious will alone.

I am not entirely aware of any specific intent on my part to explore this duality of man’s compulsions. Nor do I plan my creative efforts so that I purposefully can reveal psychoanalytic findings. I just continue to work and create. What turns out turns out.

As a gay male, I have been influenced by the work of underground artists, illustrators, and storytellers (Tom of Finland, Dom “Etienne” Orejudos, Sadao Hasegawa, Gengoroh Tagame, Ulf Raynor, and Greasetank) who have produced homoerotic visual works of a surreal rather than realistic nature specifically for a gay adult male audience. My work, like theirs, creates an imaginary world of fantasy that is not intended to exist in our real world.

I want to send a shout out to Ken Kawashima ken1171.deviantart.com/ -- professional digital artist -- for his excellent journal commentaries here at deviantART that provide a rare background on digital rendering software. Nowhere else online will you find a better or more clear background about Poser and DAZ3D.

Why am I interested in this subject? Starting in 2007, I used Poser exclusively. In those days, I saw no reason to use any other software. When Genesis from DAZ3D was introduced, it was a crossroads moment for me as someone who creates characters for digital illustrations.

DAZ3D Genesis set me free to work intuitively and translate what I see in my mind into digital form very smoothly. So, I stopped using Poser. Anyone can choose for themselves what software to use for digital illustrations, but having deep experience using both Poser and DAZ3D, I would only recommend DAZ3D.